DOES TOOTH DECAY CAUSE BAD BREATH?

Tooth decay and bad breath are something that you don’t want to have. Bad breath, for one, is embarrassing. Some sufferers don’t realize that they have it, but the people around them are afraid to tell the truth.

Several reasons can cause bad breath, and one of them is untreated tooth decay.

Bad breath and tooth decay

Dental decay can destroy your tooth enamel.

But it only happens when you don’t properly cleanse your mouth after eating.

As a result, residues of food particles can build up on the teeth, gums, and tongue, proving a place where bacteria can grow.

The primary culprit is Streptococcus mutant. This bacterium loves sugar.

As it digests sugar, it produces acids that can attack the dental enamel causing tooth decay.

Decay can cause bad breath

The bacterium and food residues stick to your teeth in a thin substance known as plaque. If that’s not removed, it hardens making it difficult to eliminate.

Plaque buildup can irritate gums, which hold your teeth in place. It will result in gum disease that’s another cause of bad breath.

Gum disease can lead to other serious dental complications, like chronic oral infections and gum bleeding. And if it’s left untreated, you’ll eventually lose your teeth.

Tooth decay is the most common diseases in children. In fact, one-fifth of kids ages two and four have dental caries.

By the time they reach 17, 80 percent of them will have one cavity.

Then, by the age of 45, two-thirds of them will lose at least one tooth as a result of untreated tooth decay.

Chronic Bad Breath

If you’re suffering from halitosis but you can’t determine the underlying cause, undiagnosed tooth decay most likely causes it.

People can’t recognize the tooth decay symptoms until the decay becomes severe or their dentist identifies it.

The good thing about bad breath as a result of tooth decay is that the condition is treatable. It’s especially true if it’s in its earliest stage. At Advanced Dental Care of Austin, we treat our patients using a fluoride product.

Fluoride treatment doesn’t reverse tooth decay. However, it can provide protection against further enamel erosion.

However, for advanced stages, your dentist may recommend the use of a filling material. But first, the decayed area must be removed and restored the affected tooth to its original form.

Then, through a filling material, your tooth’s original function will be restored.

On the other hand, if the decayed tooth is substantially damaged that it can no longer be salvaged, your dentist may replace it with a crown or man-made tooth.

A root canal may also be recommended if the decay becomes so severe that it has already penetrated your tooth enamel.

In worst cases, the entire decayed tooth may need to be removed or extracted.

Proper Oral Hygiene

Bad breath and tooth decay can be easily prevented by practicing good oral hygiene. That is, you must brush your teeth after every meal. Then, don’t forget to floss at least once or twice a day. And visit your dentist every six months or as recommended.

You Might Also Enjoy...

Could Age Be Discoloring Your Teeth?

Your smile reflects your delight, but it also may reveal your age — and not in a flattering way. Tooth stains and discoloration are side effects of getting older, but there are quick, comfortable, and safe ways to erase these smile inhibitors.

What's a Smile Makeover?

Your smile can be one of your biggest assets. It can convey friendliness, put people at ease, and inspire trust. If you aren’t confident about flashing your smile, you may be interested in a smile makeover.

The Dangers of Grinding Your Teeth

Whether you’re grinding your teeth during the day or at night while you sleep, you may be causing more problems than you think. Teeth grinding can lead to serious problems with your teeth and jaw if left untreated.